Thursday, 09 July 2020 17:05

Live-Streamed Courses:Fall Program

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Provision of Live-Streamed Courses – 2020 Fall Program

About CERGE-EI and the CERGE-EI Foundation

The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education (CERGE) was established in 1991 in the Czech Republic to offer a western-style PhD in Economics to students from the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. It subsequently formed a joint workplace with the Economics Institute (EI) of the Czech Academy of Sciences. Today, CERGE-EI offers two additional master level programs in Applied Economics and Economic Research. All faculty are western-trained and CERGE-EI graduates receive degrees that are recognized in the EU and in the US.

The CERGE-EI Foundation is a major financial supporter of CERGE-EI and, through its Teaching Fellows Program, supports western-trained economists teaching at universities across the region.

 

Dates:

Term 1: September 14-October 23, Exam week: October 26-30 (Summer time in Prague, except for the exam week)

Term 2: November 2-December 11, Exam week: December 14-18 (Winter time in Prague)

1. International Trade

Brief description

This is a course about international trade, its determinants and its consequences.  We study the ways that the patterns of international trade might be shaped by (and might in turn re-shape) a country’s available resource endowments, its technology, the income distribution, economic growth and politics. 

The course starts with the concept of comparative advantage and the gains from trade and the determinants of the patterns of trade. We will further explore the costs, benefits, and impact on income distribution of different instruments of trade protection; the effects of free trade areas (trade creation and trade diversion), and of factor mobility. Students will learn to apply the analytical toolbox of trade theory to real world situations in order to make qualitative predictions of the effects of measures such as tariffs or export subsidies

Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics at intermediate level

Lecturer: Vilém Semerák, Ph.D., in cooperation with Kresimir Zigic, Ph.D.

Vilém Semerák is a Researcher at the Economics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences. He graduated from the University of Economics, Prague (VŠE) and the Institute of Economic Studies of Charles University (IES FSV UK), studied at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and at CERGE, Charles University. He has worked on research projects in China (Shandong Economic University in Jinan, 2004-2005; East China Normal University in Shanghai, 2006).

Dates: Term 1: September 14-October 23, 2020 (exam week – October 26-30) (Summer time in Prague, except for the exam week)

Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:30-13:00 CET

2. Comparative Economic Systems (Transition Economics)

Brief description:

The course will introduce students to the economic functioning of centrally planned economies and the reasons behind their collapse. It will cover the main challenges the countries faced when transforming to market economies and analyze policies that were available and applied through the transition, such as privatization, macrostabilization, approaches to sectoral reallocation, etc. We will explore the advantages and disadvantages of the policies and assess how well they fitted the specific conditions of various countries. We will evaluate to what extent was the transition successful in achieving its goal to establish market economies and to what extent is it still a work in progress.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics at intermediate level 

Lecturer: Vilém Semerák, Ph.D.

Vilém Semerák is a Researcher at the Economics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences. He graduated from the University of Economics, Prague (VŠE) and the Institute of Economic Studies of Charles University (IES FSV UK), studied at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and at CERGE, Charles University. He has worked on research projects in China (Shandong Economic University in Jinan, 2004-2005; East China Normal University in Shanghai, 2006). 

Dates: Term 2: November 2-December 11, Exam week: December 14-18 (Winter time in Prague) Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:45-11:15 CET

3. Energy economics

Brief description:

Energy is a basic necessity of daily life and a vital input to industry in any society around the world. Energy also plays an important role in the climate policies that are aimed at the global warming problem. 

The course, taking mostly the viewpoint of economic markets and economic regulation, aims at giving the student knowledge about various topics related to the fossil fuels that are, still now and in the near future, the backbone of the present energy system.  Special focus is given on electricity and electricity markets, as electricity is expected to play a special role in the decarbonalization effort of energy systems.  Students will learn to appraise the effects (the challenges and opportunities) climate policy will have on the electricity industry. Particular attention is paid to the results of the energy policies in the energy change front runners such as California, Denmark and Germany.  The course introduces also the economic theory for climate policy and applies it on the various policies used in the past decades in US and Europe.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics at intermediate level

Lecturer: Silvester van Koten, Ph.D.

Silvester is an Associate Professor of Economics specializing in energy economics and economic experiments with a special interest in the economics of electricity markets, renewables and regulation.  Silvester received his Ph.D. from CERGE-EI in 2009, and also holds an MA in Psychology from Utrecht University. Currently, he is a Senior Researcher and Associate Professor at the Jan Evangelista Purkyně University in Ústí nad Labem, Czechia, and a Visiting Professor at the New Economic School in Moscow.

Dates: Term 1: September 14-October 23, 2020 (exam week – October 26-30) (Summer time in Prague, except for the exam week)

Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:45-11:15 CET

4. Innovation economics

Brief description:

This course will cover selected topics on Economics of Innovation. It will help students to answer the most common questions about economic aspects of innovations: Why do firms innovate and why do they strive to be first in a race of research and development? How can employees be motivated to produce innovative outputs? How innovative ideas spread and foster creation of a new knowledge? How intellectual property of innovators is protected and what are the costs and scope of such protection? Where can innovative start-up firms get money to finance their projects?

The contents of this course are based on insights from macro and microeconomics, contract theory and corporate finance. Previous knowledge in these subjects will be beneficial, but is not required. Along with the theoretical part of this course, which will be taught online, practical case studies related to each topic will be offered for in-group discussions. Local TAs will moderate the discussion at each participating university and, afterwards, the groups will be able to present their findings in a broader discussion hosted online.

Course outline:

Week 1: Competition and innovation

Week 2: Intellectual property rights protection + Case study on two previous topics

Week 3: Incentives for innovators

Week 4: Knowledge spillovers + Case study on two previous topics

Week 5: Financing constraints

Week 6: Markets for technology + Case study on two previous topics

Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics 

Lecturer: Taras Hrendash, M.A., Ph.D. cand.  

Taras Hrendash received a B.Sc. and an M.Sc. in Finance from the Black Sea State University (BSSU) in 2011 and M.A. in Economics from CERGE-EI in 2015. He is a Ph.D. Candidate at CERGE-EI (Ph.D. expected in 2020) and Junior Researcher in economics of science, technology change and innovation at IDEA Think Tank. Taras has taught several economics courses, including Innovations and Entrepreneurship at CERGE-EI. His research interest include: geography of collaboration networks, clustering of innovation, accelerated examination of patents, aging of scientists, scientometrics, and gender homophily in science.

Dates: Term 2: November 2-December 11, Exam week: December 14-18 (Winter time in Prague)

Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:30-13:00 CET

5. Labor economics

Brief description:

This course provides a standard introduction to the analysis of labor markets in market economies. The main topics covered include: an analysis of the demand for labor and market elasticity, an analysis of the supply of the labor to the market: how people decide whether to work, the role of family and life cycle, wage differentials compensation, human capital development: role of education and training, the role of unions, unemployment, and earning inequalities.  

Prerequisites: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics at introductory level 

Lecturer: Barbara Pertold-Gebická, Ph.D.

Barbara is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Institute of Economic Studies (Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University). She received her Ph.D. from CERGE-EI in 2011 and holds also an M.Sc. in Management from the Technical University in Lodz, Poland. Barbara won a Young Economist of the Year in 2009 and Prof. Vencovsky prize for young economists in 2013. Barbara’s research is focused on labor economics and applied microeconomics, specializing in women labor participation and the impact of parental leave policies.

Dates: Term 1: September 14-October 23, 2020 (exam week – October 26-30) (Summer time in Prague, except for the exam week)

Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:45-11:15 CET

 

 

 

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